Cabin Porn Roundup

Over the last few weeks, as I scrolled through my RSS reader and came across a particularly interesting or attractive cabin, I would send the page to Instapaper. Unfortunately, most of those cabins got lost in translation, so to speak, and never made it to this site for one reason or another. I’m not here to assign blame though, but instead to show off some really great cabins.

Initially, I considered starting at the beginning as I did upon discovering the Cabin Porn Tumblr last winter; having grown to 111 pages as of this writing, however, such a feat proved too daunting a task to attempt on nights and weekends. Instead, I began roughly where I had left off:

  • Atop the Rocky Mountains in Colorado, a yurt. Alternative structures such as this have always interested me, whether a simple tent or something much larger like this yurt.
  • Bridging the gap between tents, yurts, and the more solid cabins, I found this hybrid shelter at Fforest Camp near Cardigan, Wales, a very interesting idea. With a permanent structure in place presumably for those amenities tents and the like generally have difficulty offering, this shelter combined the best aspects of both types by using tents to greatly expand the available living space. What a great idea.
  • Brining this back to full-on cabins, I sat and thought about this next one — a small, abandoned cabin in Germany near the Austrian border — for a while, trying to decide what I wanted to say about it. A while passed and I still could not quite put to words the curious feeling this image brought up in me, almost a sense of deja vu as if I had been there before despite its place nearly halfway across the world. Coincidentally, this abandoned cabin in the Bavarian Alps looks almost identical in both structural design and its surrounding landscape.
  • I had no trouble with these two “huts” on Mt. Mulanje, Malawi, on the other hand: more so than actual huts, however, the landscape in which they were set reminded me of many a mountainside I drove by and hiked upon while in South Africa almost two years ago now. They bring back some great memories.
  • To break my four-post streak, lest it seem as if I had decided to link every single submission this next cabin, a small fishing hut, comes straight from Lake Titicaca, Bolivia. Like many of my favorite cabins, more so than the actual structure I love the landscape surrounding it: those mountains look like something taken out of a movie. And with the picturesque lake to the front and a nice copse of trees opposite the mountainside, I would have a hard time thinking of a more beautiful place to live in.
  • This stone cellar in Elliston, Newfoundland, reminds me of the shelter the U.S. military exiled Lieutenant John Dunbar to during most of one of my favorite films of all time, Dances with Wolves. This tipi, similarly, and its location in the snowy pines of Alaska looks just like the tribe’s winter encampment at the end of the movie.
  • I love this little cabin built atop a small island in the middle of a river in Serbia.
  • I seriously doubt I would be able to tear myself away from its view if I ever came across this privy on Red Top Mountain in Washington. Absolutely beautiful.
  • A bit of perspective in a reindeer herding cabin in North Sweden and this alpine cabin in Norway.
  • I linked to this adirondack in Another Cabin Porn Update. From that article: “I slept in this very adirondack one cold and rainy weekend a few years ago, and have spent many a night in an adirondack since then. Wonderful little buildings and a great way to spend the night.”
  • A pod house in Switzerland. Surrounded by feet of snow and dense trees on all sides, this looks like a great way to spend the cold winter months.
  • This shingled cabin in Maine makes me want to travel there even more. Perhaps someday.
  • I love this treehouse in Denmark. Having always wanted to build one of these myself, I can only imagine what it would be like to both build and have this treehouse in my own back yard.

Until next time the Cabin Porn tumblr is updated, then, I present my favorites cabins going all the way back to April.