Cabin Porn Roundup

A few more of my favorite cabins alongside some great articles on related topics and stories. If you have any interest in checking out my previous collections, start here at the beginning, then continue with November and December’s lists. If not, read on.

I collect these links and order them chronologically as I come across them, so today we’re starting off with an article from Huckberry titled Trail Life. Trail Life tells the story of one man’s journey along the entire Appalachian trail, and details his interesting introspective throughout. Amazing. I have hiked a small portion of this trail before, but nowhere near as far as Liam Cremins did. Perhaps someday.

Next in line, a sad story from the Los Angeles Times: At 94, mountain man must gradually let go of his piece of paradise. The title says it all, really: seventy-seven years after moving to this remote plot in the mountains of California, Jack English has no choice but to leave the home he made with his now-deceased wife. Incredibly sad.

And on that rather depressing note, Chris Gonzales wrote about Lodge’s Pre-seasoned Cast Iron Skillets for Tools & Toys a few weeks ago. Every kitchen should have at least one of these, no camping trip would be complete — or even doable — without one, and every cabin ought to have nothing but these in the cupboards. If I had to choose between cast iron and stainless steel, I would cook everything in a cast iron pot or pan. With the exception of boiling water, everything both cooks and tastes better when made in one of these. Careful when cleaning it, though: you cannot — and I can’t stress this enough — cannot clean it like a normal cooking pot, lest you destroy its valuable patine. In my opinion, the process is much simple with cast iron, but decide for yourself: theKitchn has a great guide complete with pictures and everything.

Finally on to actual cabins, our first comes from Banff National Park in Canada. Unsurprisingly buried in snow and surrounded with trees, you get the added bonus of a mountain looming just out your back door. I would love to spend a weekend here, regardless of season.

Shifting focus back to Huckberry, Mathew Kline talks about his trip to the last great nomadic horse culture on earth in A Mongolian Nomad. I can only imagine what it was like to take such a trip. His recount and the scenery reminded me of the three months I spent in South Africa two years ago. It’s hard to believe it has been so long.

On the topic of trips, Lonely Plant posted a list of the 10 best treks in the world.

And then back to Cabin Porn for the last time, we have this log cabin from Warrensburg, New York. How cool. Unlike most of the cabins I see and post on here, this one actually looks capable of comfortably housing more than a couple.

"Built to provide shelter for the people who did the measuring of the annual snow pack. If, when they arrived, the snow was above the door, they could climb the ladder on the outside of the steeple and enter through the small door.” I can only imagine what it was like to trudge through snow high enough to use this snow cabin’s upper door. Incredible.

Another structure erected in Oregon, this time for the exact opposite purpose, it would be pretty cool to spend an afternoon eating lunch on top of that lookout tower. What a view they must get.

Coming from across the world in Linescio, Switzerland, a home built of stacked rock some 200 years ago got renovated in 2011 with an uncompromising and curiously attractive minimalist aesthetic. Very cool.

At the other end of the spectrum, a tiny cabin in Woodstock, New York. Right after that stacked stone cabin in Switzerland, I couldn’t help but laugh at this one’s apparent attempt at mimicking it. Good try, little buddy.

Finally, one more log cabin, this time in Newfoundland. From Cabin Porn’s description: “My dad built this himself. We call it ‘The Great Escape'; just 20 mins from home (Corner Brook, Newfoundland), on a lake all on its own.” A great escape indeed.